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FROM: 1. Diagonal Stride - Classic Skiing.pdf

Tips for Diagonal Stride

(Classic Technique)

  • Completely move body weight from a balanced position on one ski to a balanced position over the other ski.
  • Keep the recovery foot unweighted until it is just in front of the support foot.
  • Balance completely over the support leg during the glide phase.
  • Maintain the same forward lean of the torso throughout the stride cycle.
  • At the end of the push phase, form a straight line with the push leg and torso from the shoulder to the snow.
  • As the legs pass each other to begin the push phase, make sure that the hip is in front of the ankle of the support foot.
  • Bring the recovery leg forward as quickly and forcefully as possible.
  • During the glide, straighten the front knee to minimize the muscular effort of the support leg.
  • Preload (flex) the push leg to enhance the power of muscle contraction early in the stride.
  • Work the arms with a relatively straight front-to-back motion; keep the hand at or below shoulder height in front when planting the pole.
  • Follow through completely with the arms from shoulder extension at the front to pole release at the back.
  • Flex the elbow joint to provide power to the first half of the poling push.
  • Make precise and coordinated body movements – given the terrain and tempo – to ensure maximum efficiency.

FROM: 2. Double Poling - Classic and Skate Skiing.pdf

Tips for Double Poling

(Classic/Skating Technique)  

  • Extend the arms forward, extend the body forward by flexing the ankle joints, and then fall forward onto the poles.
  • Bend the upper body forcefully at the waist to load the poles; then drive the arms down and back. Let the upper body sink to between 60 and 90 degrees from the vertical.
  • Bend the legs just enough for comfort.
  • Follow through with the arms until the ski pole forms a straight line with the shoulder.
  • Make sure that the shoulders lead the arms when returning to the starting position.
  • The upper body rises visibly before the arms begin reaching forward.
  • Make sure that the arms recover in a circular motion.
  • Use more pronounced front-and-back motion from the ankle as skill improves.

FROM: 3. One-Step Double-Poling - Classic Skiing.pdf

Tips for One-Step Double Poling

(Classic Technique)

  • Start in the gliding position with hands even with the hips.
  • Transfer weight completely to one ski and execute an effective push phase.
  • As the push phase occurs, both arms move forward in preparation for the double-poling phase.
  • As the upper body drops and the double-poling motion occurs, recover the rear leg to a position beside the support foot.
  • Double-pole and recover to the upright position as for double poling.

FROM: 4. Herringbone - Classic Skiing.pdf

Tips for Herringboning up a Hill

(Classic Technique)

  • Maintain the weight shift, body position, arm action and rhythm of the uphill diagonal stride.
  • Increase both the angle between the skis and the edging on the insides of the skis.
  • Move the legs straight uphill. Increase the V and edge the skis only enough to maintain traction.

FROM: 5. Uphill Diagonal Stride - Classic Skiing.pdf

Tips for Uphill Diagonal Stride

(Classic Technique)

  • Maintain excellent weight transfer.
  • Assume the same body position relative to the ground as for the diagonal stride.
  • Drive the foot of the striding leg as far uphill as possible on each stride before weighting it.
  • Make sure that the toes and ankle of the leading leg are in front of the knee.
  • As the legs stride through, keep the hips low to the ground.
  • Make sure that the push leg is still in a straight line with the torso at the end of the push phase.

FROM: 6. Free Skate TechnTips for Free Skate (Skating Technique)

Tips for Free Skate

(Skating Technique)

  • Before each push, turn the head and torso to face the new direction of travel.
  • During the recovery phase, transfer all body weight to the glide leg and balance it over the glide ski.
  • Push downward and to the side with push ski.
  • Start the push at the heel and extend it to the mid-section of the foot.
  • Fully extend the push leg.
  • Before the push phase begins, return the recovery foot to the heel-to-toe position.
  • Keep the body relatively upright throughout the manoeuvre.
  • Keep the arm action rhythmic, as in the diagonal stride.ique - Skate Skiing.pdf

FROM: 7. Offset Skate Technique - Skate Skiing.pdf

Tips for Offset Skate

(Skating Technique)

  • Before each push, turn the head and torso to face the new direction of travel.
  • During the recovery phase, transfer all body weight to the glide leg and balance it over the glide ski.
  • Push downward and to the side with the push ski.
  • Start the push at the heel and extend it at the mid-section of the foot.
  • Fully extend the push leg.
  • Before the push phase begins, return the recovery foot to the heel-to-toe position.
  • Keep the body relatively upright throughout the manoeuvre.
  • Keep the arm action rhythmic, as in the diagonal stride.
  • Start with both hands at just about the shoulder and pull straight down and back.
  • Use a three-point touch to plant the poles and the push ski.
  • Move the torso and head (as for the half skate) without a lot of up and down motion.
  • Finish the poling push and the ski push at the same time.
  • Increase the tempo and shorten the stride to maintain glide on steeper uphill terrain.

FROM: 8. One Skate and Two Skate Techniques - Skate Skiing.pdf

Tips for One Skate

(Skating Technique)

  • Double pole on each leg push.
  • Leg push is equal on both sides.
  • Direction in the first half of the manoeuvre is toward that of the push ski, while in the second half it is toward the new direction of travel.
  • Use the same leg action as in the free skate.

Tips for Two Skate

(Skating Technique)

  • Double-pole on every second leg push.
  • Leg push is equal on both sides.
  • Recover the arms smoothly.
  • Direction in the first half of the manoeuvre is toward that of the push ski, while in the second half it is toward the new direction of travel.
  • Use the same leg action as in the free skate.

FROM: 9. Half (Marathon) Skate Technique - Skate Skiing.pdf

Tips for Half (Marathon) Skate

(Skating Technique)

  • Use the leg push of the free skate, but on only one side of the body.
  • Use double poling in the first half of the push; the result is propulsion in the direction the push ski is pointing.
  • Turn the body toward the glide ski as the hand reaches the hips during the double poling action.
  • Use double poling and leg push in the second half of the push.
  • Extend the arms and the push leg completely, and finish the push phase at the same time.
  • The body weight moves to a balanced position over the glide ski during the recovery phase.

FROM: 10. Diagonal Skate - Skate Skiing.pdf

Tips for Diagonal Skate

(Skating Technique)

  • Use the same leg action, arm action and body movement as in the free skate.
  • To provide pole push, use the poles as in the herringbone.
  • Slight upper-body flex adds body weight to pole action, as does the roll of the shoulders.
  • The recovery ski contacts the snow on edge on steep uphill terrain.
  • The V gets wider as the hill gets steeper.
  • Keep the hips in front of the ankles.
  • The end of the push of the left leg coincides with the end of the push of the right arm.
  • Use a fast tempo to maintain glide.

FROM: 11. Snowplow Turns on XC Skis.pdf

Tips for Snowplow Turns

(Downhill Technique)

  • Control speed by completing turns.
  • Use a narrow wedge to start by adopting a wider wedge through the turn as ankles and knees are flexed.
  • Turn both feet in the desired direction.
  • Press and slightly edge the outside ski.
  • Keep the upper body relatively square with the skis.
  • Create continuous, round turns.
  • Rise up to the alpine stance as the turn is finished with a narrow wedge.

FROM: 12. Basic Christie Turns on XC Skis.pdf

Tips for Basic Christie Turns

(Downhill Technique)

  • Ski at a slow to moderate speed.
  • Steer in a wedge through most of the turn.
  • In the last part of the turn, pivot the uphill foot parallel to the downhill foot.
  • Finish with a skidded arc with the skis parallel.
  • Skier flexes toward the end of the turn.
  • Form round, linked turns.
  • Skier extends to form a wedge and start the next turn.